"someone can be madly in love with you and still not be ready. they can love you in a way you have never been loved and still not join you on the bridge. and whatever their reasons you must leave. because you never ever have to inspire anyone to meet you on the bridge. you never ever have to convince someone to do the work to be ready. there is more extraordinary love, more love that you have never seen, out here in this wide and wild universe. and there is the love that will be ready."

— nayyirah waheed  (via thatkindofwoman)

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.
 
 

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

media: Ezra Miller first LGBT actor cast to play superhero in franchise blockbuster!!
bisexuals: um... Alan Cumming...? Nightcrawler?? anybody?
world: no he's bisexual
bisexuals: what. what the fuck do you think the B stands for??
#and anna paquin #rogue #also bisexual #sooooo
sophygurl:

hardforbrandon:

THE FIRST POUNCE WAS ADORABLE, BUT THE SECOND ONE?????? I CAN’T TAKE THIS.

*floomp!* *fa-loomp!*
 
 

sophygurl:

hardforbrandon:

THE FIRST POUNCE WAS ADORABLE, BUT THE SECOND ONE?????? I CAN’T TAKE THIS.

*floomp!* *fa-loomp!*

 
 

in that one moment every little girl flies

 
 
 
 

anexpansionlikegold:

decenizas:

asylum-art:

Artist Marilyn Minter has worked with degraded ideas of glamour for over 30 years, beginning with the photographs she took in the late ‘60s of her drug-addicted mother. Her recent work collapses the distance between glamour and the grotesque, reflecting back to us our queasy relationship to our own desires

anexpansionlikegold

the juxtaposition here is just gorgeous

"My lawyer gives the same speech to everyone who wants to do business with me now. ‘Nicki is not one of those artists who allow her representatives to make decisions for her.’ I’m on conference calls all day with lawyers, accountants, and executives—people of power—and they treat me with respect. Because I command respect. I’m not cocky, but I deserve to know what’s going on. It’s my brand and my life. That’s my advice to women in general: Even if you’re doing a nine-to-five job, treat yourself like a boss. Not arrogant, but be sure of what you want—and don’t allow people to run anything for you without your knowledge. You want everyone to know, Okay, I can’t play games with her. I have to do right by this woman. That’s what it’s all about."

Nicki Minaj, Elle, April 2013

Adding partial source(via andyhutchins)

hey, remember how White Feminists (TM) think nicki minaj is a terrible role model for young women?

remember how White Feminists (TM) are the actual worst?

(via joz-zy)

 
 

kansenshisveryown:

northgang:

…lol @ sway’s face in the second gif [x]

She WOKE, too sad that my people 😴😴😴😴 doe.

 
 

kellylugosisdead:

captainfreisen:

redvioletz-tricksterred:

creeper-cutie:

psychopomp-sentinel:

twerkdatstrider:

neairaalenko:

ahtist:

princessickness:

karenamadof:

&ILOVEYOUTOO<3

SPREAD THE DAMN WORD

THAT WAS COOL

My hands are too small to do this effectively.

I wish I wasn’t iPod

image

if you’re on ipod you just hold down the reblog button

wtf just happened??

o ok

You don’t need to hold both alt buttons. Just one will suffice. 

 
 

tura23:

SHOWstudio: Evening In Space - Daphne Guinness / David LaChapelle / Tony…

Daphne Guinness is a sublime weirdo, I’m pretty sure she’s just wearing her own clothes in this video. I adore her.

 
 

theactualcluegirl:

postcardsfromspace:

camharr:

jessicalprice:

The brilliant camharr and I were having a conversation about Lois McMaster Bujold’s work, and she said something so resonant and on-point I had to share it (hopefully she’ll find time to blog her own thoughts about it at some point). In an interview, Bujold makes a great point about how non-universal Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey” actually is (Campbell apparently knew squat about women’s lives and made the typical male academic mistake of assuming that men’s experience is human experience full stop; we’ll leave aside for now all the other reasons the monomyth is crap). In the hero’s journey, the hero goes out into the world, does some stuff, and comes back home. But Bujold points out that given the exogamous nature of most cultures, the heroine goes out into the world, and keeps going. 

And then Cameron gave the most succinct and lovely summation of a heroine’s journey archetype I’ve heard yet:

Woman loses everything she thinks she needs, discovers her own power, and builds a family who will fight with her to the bitter end.”

Reminds me of a great article I read once about Buffy (and yes, Buffy had its problems, and yes, there are a lot of issues with Joss Whedon’s takes on female heroes, BUT). It pointed out the whole archetype of the hero as lone gunslinger, who protects the community but cannot be part of it, and who must ultimately go it alone to retain his heroic status, and described how Buffy subverts this. Spike articulates it when he notes that Buffy is different — stronger and more resilient — than other Slayers because she has a team around her, and it’s when she tries to go it alone that she (and, I think, the show) falls short. Buffy ultimately embodies a different sort of heroic archetype, one that certainly isn’t exclusively feminine, but I think speaks to more women’s experiences:

The hero is someone who builds and is the center of the heroic family. 

The family may be blood relatives, it may be teammates or coworkers, it may be a group of friends or a biker gang. But it’s a collection of people that together function in the hero role. 

Art by Howard David Johnson.

Here is the interview Jessica refers to. Spoilers only start in the Q&A portion, halfway down the page.

And I would like to write about the heroine’s journey at some point. Just muddling through my thoughts (and other commitments!) first.

Yes. So much, yes.

The hero is someone who builds and is the center of the heroic family. 

The hero is someone who builds and is the center of the heroic family. 

Dido.  Wonder Woman.  Peggy Carter.  Jane Foster.  Pepper Potts.  Hermione Granger.  

 
 

he refuses to discuss this with me. rent is 13 years overdue”